Words Have Meaning


We’ll start with an aside.  So let me get this straight.

Even so much as a dime

Bill Schmalfeldt, in effect, is arguing that the reason in so many words that John Hoge should not be suing him in Maryland is because the lawsuit is financially pointless.  Now I don’t know, I mean, I practiced law for a quarter of a century so I can’t say with certainty that I have seen everything, but I know for sure that at least one or two…

hundreds, actually, but I didn’t keep exact count

…lawsuits I knew of during that time were brought by a Plaintiff for reasons other than the recovery of money.  Sometimes they were commenced over the principle of the thing, other times to stop something from continuing to happen.  Sometimes they were were filed because someone just wanted a court to say “You win.”  I’m not saying that these latter reasons were always well-founded.  But the assumption that an argument made to Mr. Hoge that he just ought to quit because it’s just not worth it monetarily overlooks the possibility that Hoge might think that other considerations make it also worthwhile to pursue.  I’m betting that this is the case.

So, on to the meaning of words, and why Bill Schmalfeldt, as is usually the case, doesn’t really grasp them.  He says

He won't get a dime

Schmalfeldt says Hoge “cannot” collect, like there was some law that barred doing so.  Over the past couple of days he has said this, or some variant of it, over and over again.  Well, Bill

You keep using that word

It is true that there is a federal law that stops John Hoge from seizing any of the various benefits that Schmalfeldt receives through garnishment or similar action  Schmalfeldt also is protected to some degree by South Carolina law.  But Hoge’s inability to use such methods to enforce a judgment does not mean that he “cannot” collect a judgment that he would win against Schmalfeldt, however much it is.  Again, Bill says

Not $1.60

“Even if Hoge wins, he gets nothing.”

Ah, that is more like it.  Let’s parse this out.  What “Even if Hoge wins” really means is that, after John Hoge and Bill Schmalfeldt have presented all their respective evidence and argument, Schmalfeldt is conceding that Judge Hecker could conclude that Hoge is right and Schmalfeldt is wrong and enter judgment accordingly.  He is thus acknowledging that a court of law might very well say words to the effect of “Bill, you lose.  You owe John umpty-ump dollars plus fees and costs.”  Now, what at that point, ignoring the possibility of any appeal, determines that Hoge “cannot” collect his judgment?  Federal law?  Nope, Bill, try again.  Stumped?  I’ll give you a hint.

Here Brett, hold my beer

There’s nothing in federal or state law that says Bill Schmalfeldt doesn’t have to pay the judgment.  Those laws just restrict the means that John Hoge can use to enforce it.  There is nothing that prevents Schmalfeldt from stepping up to the plate and paying it voluntarily.

Except Bill Schmalfeldt.

“Cannot” doesn’t mean what Bill thinks it does.  You know, over the past couple of years we’ve found that lots of words apply to him.  Words like “liar,” “homophobe,” “misogynist”… the list goes on.  Will we be adding “deadbeat” to that list?

We’ll see.

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Words Have Meaning

  1. Neal N. Bob

    I can’t believe I’m about to ask this about someone who has misspelled his own fucking name in three different federal lawsuits, but is Bowery Bill really that goddamned dumb?

    Let’s say that Hoge can’t get around the law saying that Schmaleldt’s precious welfare can’t be garnished. To the best of my knowledge, there’s nothing stopping John from having anything Oliver Wendell Jones buys with it seized.

    In any event, I certainly hope that Drunkenstein and Bride of Drunkenstein enjoy living a flophouse for the rest of their lives because they aren’t likely to do much better. Do those ‘tards really think that a 6-7 figure judgement isn’t going to show up on a credit report? Think they’ll be able to rent anything nicer than a cardboard box under an overpass with that jumping out at anyone who cares enough to look?

    Liked by 5 people

    Reply
  2. Loren

    Some might claim that a person who gets a government disability check, while not actually suffering from the disabling condition is a deadbeat.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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