Thanks, Mr. President!


The president has commuted the sentences of 79 convicted felons.  Most it seems are drug dealers.  It appears the rationale is that the felons were convicted and sentenced back when long sentences were mandatory for some drug offenders.

In some cases, the jail doors swing open soon.  And then there are some who have had their sentences reduced.  In 2007, this guy was supposed to be locked up for good:

TAYLOR 1.png

He was a repeat felon, sorry.  He is a repeat felon, and this was his third felony conviction. Technically he had a bunch of felonies this time, as prosecutors said he ran a big drug operation. He was not a street level guy.  Many on the list were convicted of crack sales.  

He’ll be out after serving a good chunk of time:

Tony Taylor – Dunn, NC
Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); distribution and possession with intent to distribute more than five grams of cocaine base (crack) (five counts); distribution and possession with intent to distribute more than 50 grams of cocaine base (crack); Eastern District of North Carolina
Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (December 4, 2007)

Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 293 months’ imprisonment.

That’s about 24 and a half years.  Less of course with good behavior and other factors.  By the way, I’m not that far from Dunn, NC, and I just picked this guy out of the list of names.  Maybe you want to check out the commutation list at the above link for felons returning early to your community.

From the Washington Post:

The White House and the Justice Department were criticized this year by advocates of sentencing policy changes who said the administration was moving too slowly in granting commutations to inmates serving harsh sentences who met the clemency criteria. The administration has greatly picked up the pace, with 839 commutations granted by Obama this year alone. But advocates want officials to move faster before time runs out.

“At the risk of sounding ungrateful, we say, ‘Thanks, but please hurry,’ ” said Kevin Ring, vice president of Families Against Mandatory Minimums. “We know there are thousands more who received outdated and excessive mandatory sentences and we think they all deserve to have their petitions considered before the president leaves office. Petitioners are starting to get anxious because they know the president is, in prison parlance, a ­short-timer.”

I’m sure all these folks will return to their communities with new attitudes and skills which will make them successful.

 

 

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