Sears and K-Mart


Are apparently still open, but will soon close.

I miss Grants.

Business Insider:

Moody’s analysts say Sears and Kmart don’t have enough money — or access to money — to stay in business.

In a note published Wednesday, the analysts downgraded Sears’ liquidity rating, saying the company is bleeding cash and will have to continue to rely on outside funding or the sale of assets, such as real estate, to sustain operations.

Image result for old sears roebuck catalog

Grampa should have ordered two.

Who else looks shaky?

I have not been in JCPenney for anything in a long time.  Radio Shack is always empty.

 

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15 thoughts on “Sears and K-Mart

  1. Loren

    The Onion did a great riff on Radio Shack, where the CEO had no idea on how they stayed open. That said, they are not staying open. They declared bankruptcy around December last year. I don’t know of a store in the local market that is still open.

    It is just sad to see Sears go. They were THE place, if the store did not have it on the floor, you could get it in a week or less from the catalog. They had the best hand tools (Craftsman) My dad was a professional mechanic, who had toolboxes full of Craftsman tools. He said they had the thinnest wall deep sockets, that you could get into places that other company’s sockets with thicker walls would not fit. And when he did occasionally bend or break a wrench by adding 6 feet of leverage pipe, it was just go into the store and get a replacement, no questions.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. agiledog

      When I moved away from home, and started collecting my own tools, I sought Craftsman whenever possible. They were THE hand tools to own. My father-in-law use to cruise yard sales and such, looking for broken/damaged Craftsman hand tools, would buy them for pennies, and then take them to a Sears store and get a brand new one.

      The Sears Winter catalog, which for a period of time in the Seventies was called the “Wish Book”, was the source for all my Christmas present requests. I can remember one year where I gave my mother a written list, compiled from the Wish Book, with Christmas requests, and included names and page numbers from the catalog for her to find them.

      Liked by 2 people

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  2. librarygryffon

    I’ve heard some complaints lately that Craftsman isn’t what it used to be; they are now made in China and the quality has correspondingly suffered.

    That being said they’ve been predicting Sears demise for years now and they somehow keep limping along. As long as they manage to go another four years, I’m OK since I’ve got a family member working there and in 4 years they hit retirement age. Though with the stories I’ve heard about behind the scenes….

    Our local Sears is supposedly one of the better ones for sales in the region, it has certainly missed all of the purges up to now. And they haven’t had enough floor staff in years. I think it was 20 years ago that I tried to purchase something and had to walk 3/4 of the way around the upper floor of the store before I found a manned register. I was clutching the item I wanted to buy in one hand, my credit card in the other, holding them both up so they could easily be seen, and if I hadn’t found anyone by the time I reached the exit I was just going to leave and see if they noticed. Things haven’t improved much since. So I suppose the question is which came first, the lack of floor staff making purchasing items difficult so people stopped going so less money, or lower sales causing less money so hiring fewer staff?

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. Longtime Lurker

    RadioShack the company is long gone (nee Tandy Corp.). RadioShack the brand is still on life support and is owned now by a company called General Wireless Operations, Inc. They picked up the brand for pennies out of the rubble of a one-time robust company. I was there in the 80’s and 90’s and can tell you the exact moment that the handwriting was on the wall for anyone willing to look. The fact that it took another 20 years to die is what amazes me.

    I have a theory, proven many times over, that most companies which succeed, succeed in spite of their best efforts to fail.

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  4. gmhowell

    I rather hope not. Craftsmen tools are still a safe bet, if you know what to buy. (There are multiple levels of quality being sold. Gotta go for the middle or upper level.) And it’s hard to beat their deals on mowers, snowblowers, and the like.

    Kmart? Take it or leave it, I’ve never liked the store or the brand.

    On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 9:37 AM, Dave Alexander & Company with David Edgren and Gus Bailey – The Artisan Craft Blog wrote:

    > Dave Alexander (formerly ukuleledave) posted: “Are apparently still open, > but will soon close. I miss Grants. Business Insider: Moody’s analysts say > Sears and Kmart don’t have enough money — or access to money — to stay in > business. In a note published Wednesday, the analysts downgraded Sears’ > liqu” >

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    1. librarygryffon

      Good to know about the tools. I’ve been happy enough with the ones I’ve bought, but I’ve heard others complain about an alleged decrease in quality. We’ve also had a good gas mowers. (On our second because someone stole the first out of the yard when we went in for a short break one day.)

      I just wish they’d have enough staff. I might do more business there if I didn’t have to hunt all over for someone to give my money to almost every single time I go there.

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    1. gmhowell

      Used to have a few of them in MD. Nobody shed a tear when they disappeared.

      On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 2:15 PM, Dave Alexander & Company with David Edgren and Gus Bailey – The Artisan Craft Blog wrote:

      > Dave Alexander (formerly ukuleledave) commented: “We have a store in North > Carolina called Rose’s. A step below KMart, if you can believe.” >

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  5. Boston Bob

    I have wondered for years if Sears could have saved itself if they had seen the internet coming and recognized the potential before they closed their catalog business. I think it was only a couple years after they closed it that the internet really started rolling. If they’d had someone visionary enough to really go for it, they could have been Amazon before there was Amazon.

    Though, I guess if they were that visionary, they weren’t working for Sears in the 1990’s.

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  6. Mrs. Whatsit

    I can tell you what killed Radio Shack. You go in to buy something, a buss fuse for example. The idiot behind the counter, instead of allowing you to open the drawer and select a matching fuse, begins to ask a series of questions that start with, what are you going to use it for, what’s the make and model of the device, in an effort to hide that they have no idea what a fuse is and where it is in the store; in an effort to stall until the one ham who does know can walk over and help them. Then when you try to buy the 98 cent fuse, they want your name, address, telephone number and social security number. “Oh no, we’re REQUIRED to enter your social security number with every purchase.”
    Customer service and quality products, the foundation of a business.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Dave Alexander (formerly ukuleledave) Post author

      The attitude: “You’ve got questions, we’ve got answers…” I can’t even look through the store without every kid in there asking me if they can help me. I’m tempted to have a complex electronic question available just to stump them: “If I’m replacing a filter capacitor which has a rating of 400 volts, but I only have two condensers of 300 each, Should I run them in series or in parallel?”

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      1. gmhowell

        “You’ve got questions, we’ve got blank stares” is how we always phrased it.

        In the late 90’s, early oughts, there were three Shacks in the town where I lived. The one to go to was the oldest one. There was usually someone there who knew which end of the soldering iron got hot. Last time I went to one (in another town), before the final bankruptcy, I had some questions like the one you posed. They just sort of pointed to the plastic bins and said something like “I’m sure you know way more about this stuff than I do.”

        On Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 9:20 AM, Dave Alexander & Company with David Edgren and Gus Bailey – The Artisan Craft Blog wrote:

        > Dave Alexander (formerly ukuleledave) commented: “The attitude: “You’ve > got questions, we’ve got answers…” I can’t even look through the store > without every kid in there asking me if they can help me. I’m tempted to > have a complex electronic question available just to stump them: “If I’m > replacing a ” >

        Liked by 1 person

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