Alexander’s Law of Evil and Stupidity


Alexander’s Law of Evil and Stupidity: Of the two great negative forces in the world, stupidity will get you long before evil does. – Dave

From The Times of Israel:

Visitors to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum have been asked to refrain from playing the wildly popular augmented reality game Pokemon Go while at the memorial to the 6 million Jews slaughtered by Nazi Germany. – snip – 
“Playing the game is not appropriate in the museum, which is a memorial to the victims of Nazism,” museum communications director Andrew Hollinger told The Post. “We are trying to find out if we can get the museum excluded from the game.”

And also at Auschwitz:

I will not waste the electrons needed to mock the stupid people who made this happen.


 

Anne Frank was not always correct.

 

 

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5 Responses to Alexander’s Law of Evil and Stupidity

  1. And of all the Pokemon to show up at Auschwitz, a charmander has to be one of the most inappropriate.

    I understand that a tweet or text to Niantic to let them know of problems like this will be acted upon. They are using an IRL map of historic and other significant points that was the basis for their previous game, Ingress.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Actually, there are even more inappropriate ones to show up there. My daughter saw a picture someone posted of a koffing or a weezing which are poison gas.
    http://imgur.com/a/rjcqJ
    http://imgur.com/a/qWhO9
    Compared to finding one of those a charmander is positively respectful.

    Like

  3. onwyrdsdream says:

    A person will care more about potentially losing their pinky toe than the death of 100 people ten miles away they have no relation to. While some might accept the loss of their toe if it would save 100 strangers, when presented either fact dispassionately, the toe would concern them more. That doesn’t really go against the argument that “people are really good at heart.” But rather, that even if they are good at heart, loss and benefit in the things they personally find important tend to outweigh the loss and benefit of things they have no connection to. Be it NAZI Germany or slavery, dehumanizing peoples, blaming them for shared misfortunes, both were done. But even without that, it’s not like the plight of people who you aren’t connected to weighs all that much. If it did, liberals wouldn’t advocate the various policies that they do which lead to spiraling human suffering, when they also believe that dogs and cats, and also wild animals, are all enfeebled because of humans feeding them. A bear taken care of in a zoo, a dolphin raised in an aquarium, anyone’s pet dog, if given back to the wild, they’d all die. But that is how they advocate we take care of humans without social survival skills.

    Humans having more compassion for themselves and what they care for over the plight of others isn’t evil, but neither is it good. Being good is difficult, and not innate. Humans aren’t inherently good, but instead must learn to be. Many think they can be good though the use of other’s power, so they do not have to personally suffer a loss. This isn’t true, and more to the point, the end result of this … compassion from 50,000 feet up is far closer to evil than good. Shared pain leading to generational suffering with the only benefit to anyone is the feeling a few smug individuals get that they did something without having to work for it. The world is not so kind as for that to ever be true.

    Like

    • gmhowell says:

      Humans are, by nature, tribal creatures.

      On Tue, Aug 9, 2016 at 1:16 PM, Dave Alexander & Company with David Edgren and Gus Bailey – The Artisan Craft Blog wrote:

      > onwyrdsdream commented: “A person will care more about potentially losing > their pinky toe than the death of 100 people ten miles away they have no > relation to. While some might accept the loss of their toe if it would save > 100 strangers, when presented either fact dispassionately” >

      Like

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